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Sex crime conviction doesn't require a victim, court rules in case stemming from sting operation during 2017 Sturgis motorcycle rally

Sex crime conviction doesn’t require a victim, court rules in case stemming from sting operation during 2017 Sturgis motorcycle rally

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals in South Dakota has ruled a sex crime conviction doesn’t require that there’s an actual victim.

The court last week upheld the conviction of a man stemming from a sting operation during the 2017 Sturgis motorcycle rally.

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Counties Pledge to Break the Cycle Between Jail and Homelessness

Counties Pledge to Break the Cycle Between Jail and Homelessness

San Francisco and Sioux Falls might seem to share little beyond an abbreviation, but the cities wrestle with a common problem: homelessness. In the Bay Area, a persistently high unhoused population has long been a municipal crisis. But shelters are near capacity in South Dakota’s largest city, too, and the growing number of unhoused people on the streets has emerged as an issue in the current mayoral race.

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Cryptocurrency is not actually perfectly designed for crime.

Cryptocurrency is not actually perfectly designed for crime.

When the Justice Department announced in February that it had seized bitcoin worth $3.6 billion, it was more than just the largest recovery of alleged crime proceeds in U.S. history. It was the biggest signal yet that cryptocurrency, once seen as attractive to criminals for its supposed shield of anonymity, may not be so crime-friendly after all.

Just a few years ago, the federal government barely knew what to do with cryptocurrency. Now, most federal law enforcement agencies employ experts adept at tracing it. Investigators are using a new generation of sophisticated software that harnesses big data to link transactions to people, taking advantage of the fact that most cryptocurrency transactions are recorded in public ledgers that can never be erased.

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Vehicle Safety Standards, Crash Prevention & Increased Fatalities Addressed in Federal Law

Vehicle Safety Standards, Crash Prevention & Increased Fatalities Addressed in Federal Law

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act that became law in November 2021 not only lays out a spending plan for the repair of roads and bridges but also requires vehicle safety standard revisions and research as well as safety component additions over the next one to three years.

As attorney Michael R. Lemov points out in an opinion piece published by The Hill, the law within its 1,039 pages contains “little-noticed sections designed to implement a reduction in the rising toll of automobile crashes, deaths and injuries.”

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Leaking SCOTUS draft opinion overturning Roe is not a crime, expert says

Leaking SCOTUS draft opinion overturning Roe is not a crime, expert says

The stunning leak of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft majority opinion has caused speculation that the person behind the leak could be held criminally liable, but one expert is skeptical the leak itself violates any laws.

“First, without more, I don’t think there is such a crime,” Orin Kerr, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, said on Twitter Monday. “There are criminal laws against leaking classified information, of course. But draft opinions are not classified.”

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Abortion: What the potential overturn of Roe v. Wade means for South Dakota

Abortion: What the potential overturn of Roe v. Wade means for SD

As the Supreme Court deliberates Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, states across the country are preparing for the possible overturn of the Roe v. Wade abortion ruling.

Over the past few months, state legislatures have passed a variety of restrictions in anticipation of the Dobbs decision. On Thursday, a federal judge blocked a 15-week abortion ban that included reporting requirements from clinics in the state. Kentucky’s two providers said they would not be able to comply with the new reporting guidelines and the ban would have effectively eliminated access to abortion in the state.

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Lesterville Case Decision Touches On Immigration Issues

Immigration: Lesterville Case Decision Touches On Issues

A recent South Dakota Supreme Court decision in a Lesterville case has left a divided court and divided legal opinions in its wake.

Last week, the South Dakota Supreme Court handed down an opinion, which, in its attempt to ensure a defendant’s right to cross examine the witnesses against him, touches on the sensitive subject of today’s national policies and politics regarding immigration.

The appeal to the high court stemmed from a guilty verdict rendered in the case of South Dakota vs. Kevin Xavier Dickerson and Arianna Cherelle Reecy, a criminal case that was tried in circuit court.

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Mathis killings examined in new book

Mathis killings examined in new book

It was a blood-soaked night that rocked South Dakota and reverberated around the nation: A mother and two of her children shot dead in their beds on a farmstead near Mount Vernon, South Dakota, in the early morning hours of Sept. 8, 1981.

Her husband, shot through the arm but alive, called law enforcement to the scene. He reported that a masked intruder, who must have killed his wife and boys, had also surprised and shot him, then left, leaving him unconscious.

“Someone has shot my family,” Mathis told law enforcement.

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What Rights Do You Have as a Victim of a Violent Crime?

What Rights Do You Have as a Victim of a Violent Crime?

According to the United States Department of Justice, 1.6 million violent crimes were committed throughout the country in 2020. This was a decline—there were 2 million such crimes the year before. While there has been some improvement in levels of crime, that still leaves many individuals who have been victimized to deal with the trauma associated with those crimes. And that doesn’t include the victim’s loved ones and family members who may also suffer as a result.

That begs the question: What rights do violent crime victims have within the justice system?

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